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Thread: Is this conduct becoming of a company of CD Projekt's standing?

  1. Top | #41
    CEO / Owner Lisa Pham's Avatar
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    For those with slow internet speeds, here is the open letter from that article (Rock, Paper Shotgun):


    An Open Letter to the Gaming Community from CD Projekt RED


    In early December, an article was published about a law firm acting on behalf of CD Projekt RED, contacting individuals who had downloaded The Witcher 2 illegally and seeking financial compensation for copyright infringement. The news about our decision to combat piracy directly, instead of with DRM, spread quickly and with it came a number of concerns from the community. Repeatedly, gamers just like you have said that our methods might wrongly accuse people who have never violated our copyright and expressed serious concern about our actions.

    Being part of a community is a give-and-take process. We only succeed because you have faith in us, and we have worked hard over the years to build up that trust. We were sorry to see that many gamers felt that our actions didn’t respect the faith that they have put into CD Projekt RED. Our fans always have been and remain our greatest concern, and we pride ourselves on the fact that you all know that we listen to you and take your opinions to heart. While we are confident that no one who legally owns one of our games has been required to compensate us for copyright infringement, we value our fans, our supporters, and our community too highly to take the chance that we might ever falsely accuse even one individual.

    So we’ve decided that we will immediately cease identifying and contacting pirates.

    Let’s make this clear: we don’t support piracy. It hurts us, the developers. It hurts the industry as a whole. Though we are staunch opponents of DRM because we don’t believe it has any effect on reducing piracy, we still do not condone copying games illegally. We’re doing our part to keep our relationship with you, our gaming audience, a positive one. We’ve heard your concerns, listened to your voices, and we’re responding to them. But you need to help us and do your part: don’t be indifferent to piracy. If you see a friend playing an illegal copy of a game–any game–tell your friend that they’re undermining the possible success of the developer who created the very game that they are enjoying. Unless you support the developers who make the games you play, unless you pay for those games, we won’t be able to produce new excellent titles for you.

    Keep on playing,

    Marcin Iwinski
    co-founder
    CD Projekt RED

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris (Wolvenmoon) View Post
    I think Gabe Newell must have gotten through to them.
    Chris, I don't think it was to do with what Gabe said.... But, I'm sure it WAS to do with the HUGE BACKLASH they were getting from all levels... Which then made them realise the backlash was costing them a lot more (in reputation) than anything they could get out of the path they'd taken, so got off that path before it ruined them.

  2. Top | #42
    Senior Member PALADiN's Avatar
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    Maybe CD Projekt are smarter than I think.
    DRM is like kids. The less you have, the better.

  3. Top | #43
    CEO / Owner Lisa Pham's Avatar
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    Could be a number of reasons they pulled out... Pressure due to the media, backlash from consumers, didn't realise they'd be slammed for doing it (due to them not being able to 100% make sure an innocent wasn't going to get caught up in the mess), they're learning the internet is a VERY powerful tool, they're learning in general, etc, etc...

    Those are some positive reasons of why they may have pulled out, but there are a few negatives ones it could be too, which I won't mention... but I'm sure you're all smart enough to working them out yourself.

    All in all, we'll never know the REAL reason why, but no matter the reason, it's still a move in the right direction.

  4. Top | #44
    Quote Originally Posted by PALADiN View Post
    Maybe CD Projekt are smarter than I think.
    With all due respect, making an assenine statement by saying you have a 100% sure fire method of finding all pirates and then backing out does not make them smart. Remember they still originally deficated on the floor, but it's good they picked it up -- would be smart though to not do that in the first place.

  5. Top | #45
    Senior Member Chris (Wolvenmoon)'s Avatar
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    There are 100% accurate ways of identifying pirates.

    Trashing the longer post, all they'd have to do is see an IP address using bittorrent to pirate a game and then see that same IP address register(ed) to a legitimate GoG account, especially with payment information down, and there's your 100% accuracy rating right there.
    Proudly not a subscription nor microtransaction gamer. Charge me up front or not at all.

  6. Top | #46
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris (Wolvenmoon) View Post
    There are 100% accurate ways of identifying pirates.

    Trashing the longer post, all they'd have to do is see an IP address using bittorrent to pirate a game and then see that same IP address register(ed) to a legitimate GoG account, especially with payment information down, and there's your 100% accuracy rating right there.
    Unless they proxied then you'll have to get the records from the proxy provider. Granted a majority of them will never go through that trouble and you still were able to identify the account sharers.

    Outside of that however, it still leaves alone all the torrenters which my above argument still stands.

  7. Top | #47
    Senior Member Chris (Wolvenmoon)'s Avatar
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    This was all done in Germany. VPNs or proxies don't really come in to play here. Also, since we're considering multiple venues of attack, it would take two GoG users using the same German VPN/proxy before things got difficult, assuming the VPN/proxy was effective.

    Bittorrent records are going to arguably be more reliable and more precise than direct http download records. About.com has a quick synopsis on what a bittorrent tracker tracks and makes publicly available to all peers on a network, http://compnetworking.about.com/od/b.../bttracker.htm . If you connect to a bittorrent tracker as a peer you can watch and monitor who has what parts of a file, when, when they're getting specific parts, etc, all over a period of time. Bittorrent is like broadcasting what you're downloading and uploading to everyone else who is interested in it. The encryption in it really only protects against ISP attempts at meddling. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTor...col_encryption

    Proxies, VPNs, TOR, and possibly I2P2 don't always effectively hide Bittorrent traffic due to DHT. https://torrentfreak.com/common-bitt...-myths-091024/ specifically https://blog.torproject.org/blog/bit...isnt-good-idea

    There are ways to effectively mask one's traffic to a point it cannot be traced to a source, but it it involves so much effort that anyone who's able to do it in a first world country has skills enough to get paid to work on computers and it only works as long as you're running programs you trust.

    If all that was happening here was a collecting of IP addresses from bittorrent and then threatening letters, I'd be up in arms. However, there can be and is more to this.
    Proudly not a subscription nor microtransaction gamer. Charge me up front or not at all.

  8. Top | #48
    That's a damn fine post you got there... no sarcasm, I'm being literal -- that's a ton of information and super well thought-out and explained. Super thanks for that.

  9. Top | #49
    Senior Member Chris (Wolvenmoon)'s Avatar
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    Thanks. :)
    Proudly not a subscription nor microtransaction gamer. Charge me up front or not at all.

  10. Top | #50
    Senior Member fs_xyz's Avatar
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    Not connected to CD projekt, but quite the same thing...
    http://torrentfreak.com/square-enix-...irates-120115/

    What written was in the past, this is only to say CD Pro is not the 1st and only one....

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